THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF WATER LILY SEEDS

THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF WATER LILY SEEDS

WHAT IS MAKHANA?

Water lily seeds have been popped and eaten in India for thousands of years. Called makhana, they are considered a nutritious snack, and with good reason. Ayurvedic medicine recommends makhana for a wide range of health benefits, including blood sugar regulation, cardiovascular and reproductive health, and they are what is known as a tridoshic food - beneficial for all three doshas (more on these another day!)

Traditionally, makhana is flavoured with ghee and spices, sometimes added to curry, and they are a food allowed to Hindus during fasting times in the festival Navratri. When we discovered makhana during a trip to India, just by the taste we knew that we had to bring this product back and share it with all our family and friends. When we realised the health benefits we knew we were onto something bigger, and Oh Lily! was born.

WHAT ARE THE NUTRITIONAL PROPERTIES OF POPPED WATER LILY SEEDS?

Lily Pops don’t just taste amazing, they are good for you too!

  • Popped water lily seeds have an amazing amino acid profile[1], containing all nine of the essential amino acids.

  • They are low glycaemic index[1] foods, which means although they are rich in carbohydrates they are more slowly digested by the body, leading to slower absorption and metabolism which means a lower and slower rise in blood glucose and usually also insulin levels.

  • They are a low calorie food, with just 96 calories per 30g bag of Lily Pops.

  • They are a good source of fibre with around 4g per 30g bag of Lily Pops.

  • Water lily seeds contain several minerals in significant quantities, including magnesium, iron, manganese, potassium, phosphorus and copper.

  • There are 3g of plant protein per snack bag of Oh Lily! Lily Pops.

Our Lily Pops are paleo and vegan friendly as well as being gluten and refined sugar free.

So now you know all about the goodness within our Lily Pops, we urge you to join in our snacking evolution!

References:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30091404

Further Reading:

https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3065/2


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